Stacy Asher
Art, Art History + Design
University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Courses

Fall 2019


GRPH 221 / Graphic Design 01
This introductory course offers an investigation of the creation of meaning through visual form. Students will explore the relationships between form, process, perception and intention while investigating meaning through typography, image generation and manipulation, sign/symbol/icon, and visual contrasts. The dynamics of two-dimensional imagery in both representational and abstract contexts will be the focus of study. Principles of composition, expression and spatial representation are addressed. 

The goals of this course are to explore the concept of visual language through design process and principles, investigate form/content/aesthetic expression and visual communication, while learning how to use of the tools, materials & methods of the graphic designer. The concept of visual research as a graphic design practice will be applied throughout the course.
Course Syllabus
Course on UNL Canvas



GRPH 223 / Typography
This studio course introduces students to the practice, history, and theory of typography. Through design research, independent project work, and collaborative exercises; students produce typographic solutions to applied and experimental problems using typography as their primary, if not exclusive, design element.

Course work will include independent student research, sustained project work, and critiques, emphasizing the perceptual and contextual properties of typographic design. Lectures, readings, and guided discussions will supplement project work, introducing students to the topics of letter form design, printing history, typographic classification, and textual representations.

Course Syllabus
Course on UNL Canvas



GRPH 428 / Design Studio 02 / Capstone Exhibition
This mandatory course is the culmination of the developed practices for students graduating with a BA or BFA with an emphasis in Graphic Design. Extended research opportunities, peer and professional collaboration, and critical thinking development will allow students the opportunity to develop and produce a body of work related to the visual and written documentation initiated in Design Studio I for presentation in the Capstone exhibition. Students will develop advanced comprehension of problem solving skills required to actively participate in professional environment.

The course will also provide opportunity to work collaboratively on various exercises, research opportunities, and evaluation of working processes, to develop portfolio, resume and self-promotional skills suited for professional practices. Through research presentations, discussions and demonstrations by the professor and invited guests, students will learn strategies that will develop a body of work reflective of the particular needs expected in order to be successful within the graphic design field. Meaning through form is emphasized while students continue to build on experience of working with tools, materials, and methods of a professional graphic designer.

Course Syllabus
Course on UNL Canvas
Course Schedule
Course in UNL Box


Capstone Portfolio Spring 2019

UNL Design Portal
UNL Social Practice Coalition





Resources

428: Leonard/Design Research, required
        Leborg/Visual Grammar, required
        Bestley/Visual Research, required


Read
Listen
Write
Do something.

Site / Sight
Space /
Place
Public / Private
Inside /
Outside

 

 





1950sgraphic ModernPeriodicalSwitzerlandTMYves Zimmermann

 

Stacy Asher
Associate Professor of Art
209A Woods Art Building
Department of Art + Art History
University of Nebraska–Lincoln

stacyasher@unl.edu
stacyasher.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Archive

GRPH 426 / Design Studio 01
Students will demonstrate a synthesis of skills, methodologies and principles developed in previous graphic design courses. It will focus on the application of advanced graphic design principles and systems in the generation of self-authored body of written and visual work. Visual, written and spoken presentation skills will be emphasized in preparation for Design Studio II: Capstone. Meaning through form is further emphasized while students build on their advanced experience of working with tools, materials, and methods of a graphic designer. Advanced design skills will be applied to the development of various self-directed projects. Critical thinking, concept development and design research as a process will be further emphasized as they are applied to a self-authored study. The course will focus on the evolution of a unique personal voice in the design process and content development, as well as the refinement of graphic design detail to achieve a higher level of sophistication in the designed artifact.

GRPH 324 / Publication Design
This course examines the form and function of publications. Students will utilize strategies, skills and methodologies introduced in previous graphic design courses and will build upon these in order to further expand their understanding and vocabulary of design. Students will develop a deeper understanding of typography and the integration of information into a publication format. Projects expand in complexity and focus on the challenges of designing publications.

Students will be introduced to history, theory and the practice of publication design. Through design research, independent project work and collaborative exercises, students will investigate the ways in which various publication models have served different needs for their publishers, writers, and readers. Course work will discuss contemporary topics such as digital editorial design and the modern book (interactive storytelling, ebook publishing and blogging) as well as more historically significant modes of publishing like handmade books (softcover construction, sewn binding structures, books as art), magazine design and book cover design.  Lectures, readings and guided discussions will supplement project work, introducing students to the topics of design authorship, the history of reading, reception theory, and the future of the book.













 






Making the Invisible Visible, by Stuart McKee 

Data Visualization Symbols


UNL Design Portal
UNL Social Practice Coalition
Graphic Design Beyond the Classroom



Spring 2016
GRPH421 / Advanced Graphic Design
Students engage in the study and production of graphic design artifacts while thinking critically about the role of visual communications. Students create digital, video and printed material and present proposals for public installations, exhibitions and video projections. The course outcomes provide the opportunity for students to be innovative, culturally critical and learn to become more careful observers of the world around them.

Visual communications as a tool for organizing social interactions and how graphic design contributes to the promotion of well being while enhancing the production of social capital is a focus of study for the course.



Womens Summit / UNL / Center for Civic Engagement

 

Fall 2015 Courses~

GRPH223 / Typography
This studio course introduces students to the practice, history, and theory of typography. Through design research, independent project work, and collaborative exercises; students produce typographic solutions to applied and experimental problems using typography as their primary, if not exclusive, design element.



GRPH 421 / Advanced Graphic Design
Visual communications as a tool for organizing social movements and how graphic design can contribute to the promotion of well being and enhance the production of social capital were the focus of study for this course. Students engaged in the study and production of graphic design artifacts while thinking critically about the role of visual communications. Projects centered around the subject of social justice, civil liberties, and processes of civic engagement through visual communications.

Fall 2015 Programs / Events Exhibitions~

Eyes Open: A Pop Up Exhibition of Graphic Design
at Prairie Pines

Design + Social Justice Symposium
The events and exhibitions of the symposium will highlight the visual communications, stories and portraits of revolutionary social movements and will examine how graphic design is a tool for organizing. The graphic artifacts that will be exhibited represent the role of art as a revolutionary force and how art and design can communicate about a need for social change. The symposium will examine the role of graphic design in creating messages that promote civil and human rights, preservation of the environment, and advocacy of equal opportunity.

Sheldon Museum of Art / Art + Social Justice

E.N. Thompson Lecture Series

 

Spring 2015 Courses
GRPH 421 / Advanced Graphic Design
Food. Water. Energy. Landscape Systems. People.
Visualizing Healthcare + Mapping Systems